Archive for April, 2020

No Fooling!

April 1, 2020

Mei-Ling’s Attention Is Split

Lately, I’ve noticed a lot of emphasis on the idea that people should “make the most” of their enforced stay at home time to read or do art or write that novel they’ve been meaning to write.  While this is presented as a positive message, I see it as creating extra pressure at a time when we just don’t need it.

First of all, “Stay At Home” does not immediately mean “staycation.”  For many people staying at home means trying to work from home while dealing with kids who, in turn, are trying to learn how to do their lessons on-line and discipline themselves when they’re used to being kept in order by others.

Whether you’re an adult or a kid, working from home is not easy, especially if you’re used to thinking of your home as your “play space,” rather than your work space.  This is one reason why Jim and I have a dedicated office—so it’s possible to walk away from work at the workday’s end.

Further, I really feel for those people who are in jobs that have been deemed “essential.”  At a time when the refrain is some variation of “stay and home and stay safe,” they’re walking out the door every day, haunted by the awareness that if they want to stay employed, they can’t “stay safe.”  Worse, this is going on with “make the most of your stay at home” providing the sense that everyone who is staying home is whooping it up, binge watching shows, cooking fancy meals, leveling up on the computer game of their choice or whatever…

As someone who has worked from home since mid-1994, my work life has not really been changed…  Except that it has been.

Many years ago, I learned that uncertainty can take over my writer brain.  Instead of my subconscious playing out scenarios for the characters in whatever story I’m working on, it’s busy spinning scenarios large and small.  Should we keep that dinner date for Saturday?  (No.)  Will the vet have Kwahe’e’s prescription? (Maybe.)  If not, can we get what he needs somewhere else?  What do we do if any of our elderly (and in our case, non-local) family suddenly get sick?  Will the small businesses survive?

I’ve been a writer for a long time, so I’ve learned tricks for easing myself into my writing space, but I’m not going to pretend that it’s been easy or automatic.  Making it harder is that I’m transitioning into a new project (Star Kingdom novel 4) while waiting on the proofs of Wolf’s Soul, so I’d be a bit off-balance anyhow.

I’m more or less fine during the day, but when I sleep the nightmares get hitched to a variety of elaborate carriages, some often so real that I need to do a reality check come morning.

Despite my overactive imagination, I feel as if I’m a lot better equipped to deal with forced isolation (as of this post, I haven’t been away from my house and yard in two weeks) than many.  I’m an introvert by nature, so while I miss seeing my friends, having my weekly RPG, and the like, having my social life restricted to Jim, the cats, the guinea pigs, and the fish isn’t all that different from normal.

I think that’s where my dislike of the “make the most of” refrain is coming from.  I already am doing that.  I do that every day.  And I sympathize with those people who, on top of dealing with the cascade effect of a pandemic, now feel they should be on holiday or becoming great artists or authors or whatever.

Take care, folks.  Be well.  Do what you can.  Don’t feel pressured to do one iota more!